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Olive Trees from the Holy Land

by Fern on May 12, 2009

in Product Review

Check out what I just found in my email inbox (thanks Larry!). You can have your own olive tree from the Holy Land. You would be getting the great, great, great…great grandchild of an olive tree that was producing fruit when Moses was wandering in the desert. According to this site, olives have been cultivated in Israel for over 2,500 years!

A basin dug in a clay layer in the seashore off Mt. Carmel, was found full of olive pits and organic material. It seems that the oil was produced there in an ancient, traditional method called “Shemen Rahutz” (ancient Hebrew) or “Zeit Taphakh” (Palestinian Arabic). In addition to this botanic evidence of olive pits, dozens of uniform special installations cut in the rock surface proved the existence of advanced preliminary oil production.

Kind of reminds me of the trees you can get that are the offspring of the “Survivor Tree” at the site of the Oklahoma City bombing. I like the idea of growing a tree with meaning. Whether it be from a special place, or the offspring of a special tree, or just a tree that commemorates a special time in your life. Trees are so metaphorical, I guess it isn’t that hard to find special meaning behind them.

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Zach May 12, 2009 at 8:38 am

Very cool! I rushed over to the website to buy one before realizing they are also very expensive.

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Fern May 12, 2009 at 8:54 am

Zach — Yeah, that part is kind of a downer. Although domestic olive trees aren’t that much cheaper.

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Genevieve May 13, 2009 at 6:52 am

Oh awesome, my friend Oleg will love this! Thanks for the tip, Fern!

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invisiblebees May 13, 2009 at 10:38 am

I LOVE the idea of having a tree biologically connected to a known time and place. Imagine having a whole grove of these trees!

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Fern May 13, 2009 at 10:57 am

invisiblebees — You should check out http://www.historictrees.org/, they sell trees that are the offspring of trees at historic sites. For example, you can purchase the offspring of the white ash tree that grow’s near Harriet Beecher Stowe’s home, or sycamores that are grown from seeds that were taken to the moon, or the offspring of the Guale Indian’s Lover’s Live Oak.

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