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Birds Bees & Butterflies

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This is the time of year when Monarchs are headed towards their winter roosting sites. Have you seen any Monarch butterflies in your garden yet? Here’s how to support them during their trip (and ideas for next Spring). Read my full post on Fiskars.com >>>

p.s. Did you know that the reason Monarch caterpillars feast on milk weed leaves is that the leaves contain a compound that makes the caterpillars and their eventual adult selves taste bad, which discourages predators. Pretty smart, eh?

 

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The following is the transcript of our Flower Chat held on August 18, 2011. The chat was moderated by yours truly (@lifeontheblcny). Our guest was Dave Bushnell (@BushnellGardens), the owner of Bushnell Gardens Nursery in Granite Bay, CA. We discussed attracting wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies to the garden.

Thanks to everyone who participated in the discussion!

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More Wildlife Pallet Garden Photos

July 29, 2011
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Here are some more photos of the wildlife friendly pallet garden I made for Eat Real Fest LA…

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Create a Bee and Butterfly Friendly Pallet Garden

July 26, 2011
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I recently had an immense amount of fun talking about growing food in urban spaces and attracting birds, bees, and butterflies at Eat Real Fest in Los Angeles. For part of my demonstration, I created a special wildlife-friendly pallet garden with plants donated by Proven Winners. I think it turned out really cool!

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Welcoming Wildlife to your Urban Garden

June 7, 2011
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My latest post for Fiskars is up! Check it out: It can be a challenge to bring a little life into the “concrete jungle,” but where there’s a will, there’s a way! No matter how urban the area is that you live in, there are things you can do to invite birds, bees, butterflies, and […]

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Ladybugs Love Container Gardens!

November 3, 2010
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These are photos I’ve snapped of ladybugs in my own container gardens, and those of clients or friends. I would say that ladybugs really love container gardening (especially when the garden includes dill!) as much as people do! Do you ever see ladybugs in your garden?

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Make Your Own Bird Bath, It’s Easy!

July 6, 2010
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A bird bath can be used for a number of things on a balcony. Obviously, it can be a great way to attract and entertain your local bird community. But you could also load it up with tiny tea lights to add light and romance to your balcony. Or if you have plants that prefer […]

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Container Gardening Grab Bag 6/25

June 25, 2010
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Interested in growing things upside down? Mr. Brown Thumb has got a homemade, upcycled version for you to check out. Who knows what goes on in your garden when you’re not there? Well, Gayla of You Grow Girl does! Check out her time lapse video of her garden. Grow what you can, where you can. […]

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Wordless Wednesday – Pollinator Extravaganza!

June 23, 2010
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How Will YOU Celebrate National Pollinators Week?

June 21, 2010
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This week is the 4th Annual National Pollinators Week. Yep. That’s right. A whole week dedicated to the bees, butterflies, birds, insects, and other creatures that work with nature to pollinate flowers. About 75% of all flowering plants rely on insect or animal pollinators and over 200,000 different species act as pollinators. Pretty amazing, eh? […]

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