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A Simple, Yet High-Impact Container Idea

by Fern on May 4, 2010

in Container Combos,Flowers Galore,Popular

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I really shouldn’t post this today, I should wait until all the flowers are blooming to photograph and share it. But I couldn’t resist, I am so excited by this combo. Since I grew so many ‘Spitfire’ Nasturtiums for the GROW Project, I’ve decided to incorporate the fiery red-orange of the flowers into my overall scheme this year. I’m going to for black, red, and yellow balcony. I already had a lot of black plants, so it shouldn’t involve too many new additions.

This is a really easy to recreate container idea. Just three plants and a 12 inch pot. No stuffing plants in spots that are too small for their root balls or anything like that. After I got my supplies and plants together, I finished the whole thing in 5 minutes.

  • A – Snapdragon ‘Florini Amalia Orange’
  • B – Dahlia ‘Bishop’s Children’
  • C – Sun Drops (Calylophus drumondii) ‘Southern Belle’

Why this Container Works

For starters, there are three different shapes that all serve a different purpose. The dahlia adds height, the snapdragon fills the middle ground, and the sun drops soften the edge by spilling over the rim. There are also contrasting leaf shapes and colors, from finely cut needle-like foliage, to the broad, dark leaves. And of course, the colors are pleasing together, at least they are to me. The red-orange snapdragons really pop off of the dark foliage and the yellow flowers of the sun drops compliments both the red-orange flowers and the dark leaves.

Note: The Sun Drops are from Proven Selections, which means that when Proven Winners trialed it at their various regional locations, it did not perform universally well. This doesn’t mean that it’s a bad plant, it just means that the plant may be an annual in your area, or can’t handle weather conditions in some parts of the country. If you can’t find Sun Drops, replace it with another yellow-flowered plant, such as a yellow calibrachoa.

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